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The Princessehof National Museum of Ceramics
Grote Kerkstraat 11
8911DZ Leeuwarden
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General accessibility Leenrolstoel For blind or partially sighted Begeleider gratis For wheelchair users or poorly injured visitors For deaf or hearing impaired persons For visitors with an assistant dog

Made in Holland400 jaar wereldmerk

Dutch ceramics has been known around the world for centuries, but its origin is rarely in the Netherlands. Ceramics from abroad was processed here into something new, successfully created and then exported to other countries. The Made in Holland exhibition explores the development and dissemination of ceramic techniques, styles and products, with the Netherlands as a focal point.

Iconic styles

A nice example is Delft Blue. A Dutch icon, but it is full of international i…

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Made in Holland400 jaar wereldmerk

Dutch ceramics has been known around the world for centuries, but its origin is rarely in the Netherlands. Ceramics from abroad was processed here into something new, successfully created and then exported to other countries. The Made in Holland exhibition explores the development and dissemination of ceramic techniques, styles and products, with the Netherlands as a focal point.

Iconic styles

A nice example is Delft Blue. A Dutch icon, but it is full of international influences. The Dutch East India Company introduced Chinese ceramics to the Netherlands in around 1600. This blue and white porcelain was extremely popular and very costly. Dutch ceramics factories started imitating it with painted earthenware, a technique that in turn came from Italy. Many of these factories were located in and around Delft, hence the name Delft Blue. The quality of the imitations was so high that it was fully exported to the rest of Europe and Asia. It became so popular in those countries that producers in Russia, Portugal and Japan started making their own imitation Delft Blue.

Success stories

In the nineteenth century Dutch pottery manufacturers were once again able to create their own success out of a foreign-developed technique – in this case English Creamware. These Maastricht-based factories exported their products all over the world up into the 20th century. A third success story is the ceramics in art nouveau and art deco styles. Both styles found their origins abroad, but were quickly embraced by Dutch artists and designers and processed into our own variant. Dozens of new pottery factories produced this 'pottery renovation' and it gained international recognition.

Export product par excellence

Dutch Design remains a world famous export product of our country. Dutch Design is a concept, a trademark and popular with the general public. The inquisitive approach of designers in collaboration with traditional ceramic companies turned out to be a successful formula, with leading products as a result.

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When

  • every Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday until June 30th, 2019from 11:00 to 17:00
  • Opening 2 juni

Take a look

Prices

  • Adult€12.50
  • CJP (Cultural youth pass)€9.50
  • ChildrenFree Kinderen t/m 17 jaar oud
  • MJK (Museumjaarkaart)Free

Attributes

Additional Information Cultural Capital 2018

  • Type of event: Exhibition
  • Main language: Dutch, English, Frisian, German
  • Discipline: Biodiversity

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